Crowdsourced Wisdom for Tomorrow’s World

Flash Symposium

Aftermath of an Echo Chamber

The World After the Bubble Burst

12 Perspectives From Around the World

[ditty_news_ticker id=”142″]

Voices From Our Partners

A 360-Degree View on the Global Repercussions of the Withdrawal From Afghanistan

Online Symposium

The Foreign Affairs Forum presents 12 global perspectives on what the fall of Afghanistan means for international relations. We ask thinkers from respected institutions in U.S. partner countries around the world about the short, medium, and long term consequences for international security and the future of international relations.

No algorithms. No bubbles. No echo chambers.

Crowdsourced Wisdom for Tomorrow’s World

The REGION

FRANCE

“If I were a Taiwanese, a Georgian, a Ukrainian, 
I wouldn’t be reassured after what I saw in Afghanistan.”

Patrick Chevallereau from the French Institut de Relations Internationales et Stratégiques (Institute of International Relations and Strategy) on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on French and European security.

The REGION

ESTONIA

“We will never say that
there are too many American troops in Europe.”

A conversation with Kalev Stoicescu and Martin Hurt from the Estonian International Centre for Defence and Security on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on Estonian security.

The REGION

PHILIPPINES

“For the United States to keep the status quo in the South China Sea, it will need its allies.”

A conversation with Aries Arugay, professor at the University of the Philippines Diliman on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on Filipino security and foreign policy.

ITALY

“We must work more in and through international institutions in cooperation with others to expand further and strengthen international law and multilateral diplomacy.”

A conversation with Mario Del Pero from the Italian Institute For International Political Studies (ISPI) on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on Italy, Italian and European security, and NATO.

PAKISTAN

“It always has been a transactional relationship between Pakistan and the U.S… but now Pakistan’s leadership has taken a shift from geo-politics to geo-economics.”

A conversation with Muhammad Taimur Fahad Khan, research associate at the Institute of Strategic Studies Islamabad (ISSI) on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on Pakistani security and foreign policy, and on the stability of the larger region spanning South Asia to the Middle East.

GERMANY

“I see no alternative to strengthening European integration and coordination particularly if Germany and Europe want to play a role in a bipolar world next to the United States and China.”

A conversation with Julian Müller-Kaler, a Senior Project Officer of The Americas Program at the German Council on Foreign Relations,on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on German and European security and foreign policy, and consequences in East Asia.

The REGION

JAPAN

“We’d like to welcome the U.S. rebalancing to East Asia… but consecutive administrations since Bush Jr. have tried that and they all failed.”

A conversation with Tetsuo Kotani, a Senior Research Fellow at The Japan Institute of International Affairs, on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on Japanese security and foreign policy in the Far East.

The REGION

ETHIOPIA

“Respect! Context is key… your Secretary of State writing a letter in which instructions are given to an independent, legitimate, sovereign state definitely conflicts with your core values.”

A conversation with Yonas Adaye Adeto, director of the Institute for Peace and Security Studies at Abbis Ababa University on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on security and foreign policy in Ethiopia, the Horn of Africa, and beyond.
The REGION

INDIA

For India the worst possible outcome has come true… this is really a watershed moment in our history… [like] what in the U.S. was the end of the Soviet Union.”

A conversation with Kriti M. Shah, Associate Fellow in the Department of Strategic Studies at the Observer Research Foundationon the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on security and foreign policy in India, the Indian Subcontinent, and the Indo-Pacific region.

UKRAINE

With all these changes of priorities in U.S. foreign policy, Europe should be if not always at the top, but somewhere near.”

A conversation with Oleksiy Melnyk, a Co-Director of Foreign Relations and International Security Programmes at the Razumkov Centre in Kiev, Ukraine, about the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on security and foreign policy of the Ukraine, NATO, Europe, geopolitics, and relations with the U.S.

UK

There is a sense that most of what President Biden has been doing in terms of his foreign policy has also been looking at his domestic constituency.

Royal United Services Institute

A conversation with Aaditya Dave, a Research Analyst focusing on South Asia in the International Security Studies department at the Royal United Services Institute on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on the security and foreign policy of the UK, its relationship with the U.S., and the larger geopolitical consequences.

AUSTRALIA

“Nobody wants to live under China’s shadow, and everybody understands that the most important way in which China’s power can be balanced and moderated is through a strong U.S. role in the region.”

A conversation with Hugh White, professor emeritus associated with the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre (SDSC) at the Australian National University on the implications of the Afghanistan withdrawal on Australian security and foreign policy, U.S.-Australian relations, and the geopolitical situation in the Indo-Pacific..